Mon. May 27th, 2024

Archive | 15 years ago, Americans brought Barack Obama to power

Natasha Kumar By Natasha Kumar Mar15,2024

Archives | 15 years ago, the Americans brought Barack Obama to power

Open in full screen mode

On November 4, 2008, Barack Obama became the first black president of the history of the United States.

Radio-Canada

Fifteen years ago, on November 4, 2008, Barack Obama became the 44th President of the United States. Our archival reporting looks back at this historic election.

At 47, Barack Obama, the first African-American to run for president, presents a sheet impressive road. However, beyond his political career, it is his singular personality that fascinates, both among his admirers and among his detractors.

In this report broadcast at Téléjournalon August 25, 2008, journalist Joyce Napier and director Bruno Bonamigo are in Chicago to present Barack Obama, the man who aspires to become the next president of the United States.

< source srcset="https://ici.radio-canada.ca/audio-video/lib/img/extras/HR/2023-10-31_11_22_31_ARCHIVESWEB_0001_01.jpeg" media="(min-width: 0px) and (max- width: 1239px)">< p class="StyledImageCaptionLegend-sc-57496c44-2 sbxsP">Joyce Napier and Bruno Bonamigo introduce us to Barack Obama, the man who aspires to become the next president of the United States.

This report focuses on Barack Obama's journey as a community organizer in Chicago's South Site and as a lawyer passionate about constitutional law.

Through his work as a community organizer, Barack Obama wants to mobilize the black community and expand his network. He aspires to real power, the only way, according to him, to change things.

LoadingNo , Quebec will not have more powers in immigration, says Trudeau

ELSEWHERE ON INFO: No, Quebec will not have more immigration powers, says TrudeauLoading in progressNo, Quebec will not have more powers in immigration, says Trudeau

ELSELL ON NEWS: No, Quebec will not have more immigration powers, says Trudeau

It was in Chicago that Obama honed his oratorical skills, that he learned the more passionate style of Martin Luther King.

A quote from Joyce Napier

Martin Luther King: a key speech against discrimination

On November 5, 2008, Joyce Napier reports on Obama's resounding victory, which will mark the story in several respects.

His report is presented on the program 24 hours en 60 minutes, hosted by Anne-Marie Dussault.

Reporting by journalist Joyce Napier on Barack Obama's electoral victory. Host: Anne-Marie Dussault.

The first black person to be elected president of the United States, this Democrat also managed to get 64% of registered voters to go to the polls, the highest voter turnout rate in 100 years.

Barack Obama finished with 349 voters, compared to 163 for Republican candidate John McCain.

After the historic triumph comes the inevitable and harsh reality. As journalist Joyce Napier points out, Barack Obama inherits a nation on the brink of a recession and a country at war on two fronts [in Iraq and Afghanistan].

A few months later, on January 20, 2009, the Radio-Canada correspondent in Washington presented a report on the swearing-in of the new president.

< p class="StyledImageCaptionLegend-sc-57496c44-2 sbxsP">Reporting by Joyce Napier on the swearing-in of the 44th President of the United States, Barack Obama. The news bulletin is hosted by Céline Galipeau.

(New window)Once again, this moment marks American history as a human tide of two million people filled with " hope attends the inauguration ceremony of the first black president.

A man whose father might not have been served in a neighborhood restaurant 60 years ago can now stand and take the oath.

A quote from Barack Obama

Start of widget . Skip widget?End of widget. Return to start of widget?

Natasha Kumar

By Natasha Kumar

Natasha Kumar has been a reporter on the news desk since 2018. Before that she wrote about young adolescence and family dynamics for Styles and was the legal affairs correspondent for the Metro desk. Before joining The Times Hub, Natasha Kumar worked as a staff writer at the Village Voice and a freelancer for Newsday, The Wall Street Journal, GQ and Mirabella. To get in touch, contact me through my natasha@thetimeshub.in 1-800-268-7116

Related Post