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A Cuvier’s dwarf caiman saved from traffickers

Natasha Kumar By Natasha Kumar Mar17,2024

Un Cuvier's dwarf caïman saved from traffickers

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The enclosure Javier is placed in includes a swimming area, a lounging island, driftwood and a variety of live plants.

Radio-Canada

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A young caiman, a cousin of alligators, has been intercepted by Canadian authorities as part of a coordinated effort to combat wildlife trafficking. The exotic animal was kept without the necessary permits.

Named Javier, Cuvier's dwarf caiman, native to northern and central Australia. South America, will temporarily reside at Victoria Butterfly Gardens on Vancouver Island while awaiting legal proceedings to decide its future, a process that could take several years.

As a juvenile, Javier currently measures just over 18 inches long and weighs just over 1 pound, according to Falon Lancey, curator of animals at the Victoria Butterfly Gardens. Adults, however, Cuvier's dwarf caimans can measure up to 152 cm long.

According to the curator, Javier has adapted very well to its new environment.

He immediately lounged, he swam, he ate a lot and regularly. We were pleasantly surprised.

A quote from Falon Lancey, curator of animals at the Victoria Butterfly Gardens

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A release from Victoria Butterfly Gardens says Javier will receive veterinary care, enrichment activities and behavioral training.< /p>

Crocodilians, which include caimans, are legally controlled exotic species (New window) in British Columbia, meaning it is illegal to transport or possess them without a special permit.

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Properly caring for an animal like the caiman is extremely difficult and expensive, according to the Victoria Butterfly Gardens.

Falon Lancey believes that although Javier should not have ended up in British Columbia, she hopes his presence can raise awareness public about the dangers of keeping an exotic animal as a pet.

When people can see something in real life, they can learn about it. They are more likely to care and think about how we can protect them.

A quote from Falon Lancey, Curator of Animals at the Victoria Butterfly Gardens

With information from Michelle Gomez

Natasha Kumar

By Natasha Kumar

Natasha Kumar has been a reporter on the news desk since 2018. Before that she wrote about young adolescence and family dynamics for Styles and was the legal affairs correspondent for the Metro desk. Before joining The Times Hub, Natasha Kumar worked as a staff writer at the Village Voice and a freelancer for Newsday, The Wall Street Journal, GQ and Mirabella. To get in touch, contact me through my natasha@thetimeshub.in 1-800-268-7116

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