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UPEI scientists produce hydrogen from leftover potatoes

Natasha Kumar By Natasha Kumar Dec18,2023

UPEI scientists produce hydrogen from leftover potatoes

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Yulin Hu, an assistant professor at UPEI's Faculty of Sustainable Design Engineering, is one of the scientists researching new ways to produce hydrogen, including from biowaste.

Radio-Canada

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Researchers from the University of Prince Edward Island have received a federal grant to continue their work on the valorization of certain waste. The goal is to successfully generate biofuels and products capable of capturing CO2.

When you process potatoes, you will generate a lot of waste, says Yulin Hu, assistant professor at UPEI's Faculty of Sustainable Design Engineering, referring to the province's main agricultural industry.

Scientist seeks solutions to replace fossil fuels and fight climate change.

In this context, she is interested in the waste of everyday life that is wasted, and more particularly in potatoes. In her laboratory, she succeeded in transforming the tubers into raw material, in order to produce hydrogen.

The simulation results show us that potato waste is a promising raw material that we could use and convert into hydrogen, she explains.< /p>LoadingEvacuations and rivers under surveillance in the greater Quebec region

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The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada awarded him a grant of $142,500 over five years to move from simulation to building a machine to produce biofuels and products that can capture CO2 from biowaste.

Yulin Hu hopes to carry out the first trial next year.

Potatoes aren't the only option tested in the UPEI lab.

Sawdust could absorb CO2, while tunicates , an invasive species that attacks mussel farms, could be transformed into biofertilizer.

We are trying to convert all kinds of organic waste and then convert it into a product that could potentially benefit the province.

A quote from Yulin Hu, Faculty of Sustainable Design Engineering of Other scientists at the university are working on the production of hydrogen from solar energy, using ultraviolet rays.

With information from CBC .

Natasha Kumar

By Natasha Kumar

Natasha Kumar has been a reporter on the news desk since 2018. Before that she wrote about young adolescence and family dynamics for Styles and was the legal affairs correspondent for the Metro desk. Before joining The Times Hub, Natasha Kumar worked as a staff writer at the Village Voice and a freelancer for Newsday, The Wall Street Journal, GQ and Mirabella. To get in touch, contact me through my natasha@thetimeshub.in 1-800-268-7116

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