The Verkhovna Rada proposed to limit the use of Russian music and the import of books in Russian

The Verkhovna Rada proposed to limit the use of Russian music and the import of books in Russian

The Verkhovna Rada proposed to limit the use of Russian music and the import of books in Russian

The Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine   The Verkhovna Rada proposed to limit the use of Russian music and the import of books in Russian

Kyiv said that more and more Ukrainians do not accept & #171;any Russian creative products at the physical level»

Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine on Sunday approved two laws that impose severe restrictions on Russian books and music, in a move by Kyiv to sever many of the remaining cultural ties between the two countries after Moscow's invasion.

One of the laws prohibits the publication of books written by Russian citizens unless they renounce their Russian passport and take Ukrainian citizenship. It also prohibits the commercial import of books published in Russia, Belarus and the occupied Ukrainian territories, and requires a special permit for the import of books in Russian from any other country.

Another law prohibits the performance of music created by Russian citizens after 1991 in the media and on public transport. At the same time, quotas for Ukrainian spoken and musical content on television and radio are being increased.

Laws must be signed into law by President Volodymyr Zelensky before they come into force, and there is no sign that he will oppose this. Both laws received widespread support among MPs, including MPs who were generally seen as pro-Russian by most Ukrainian media and civil society.

Ukraine's Minister of Culture Oleksandr Tkachenko welcomed the new restrictions.
< br />“These laws are designed to help Ukrainian authors share quality content with the widest possible audience, which, after the Russian invasion, will not accept any Russian creative production on a physical level,” he was quoted as saying by the website of the Ukrainian Cabinet of Ministers.

De-Russification

The new rules are another chapter in Ukraine's long journey to rid itself of the centuries-old legacy of Moscow rule.

Ukraine has said that this process, formerly called “decommunization” but now increasingly called “de-Russification”, is necessary in order to get rid of the consequences of centuries of policies aimed at suppressing Ukrainian identity.

With this Moscow disagrees, which claims that Kyiv's policy of strengthening the role of the Ukrainian language in everyday life leads to harassment of a large number of Russian-speaking residents of Ukraine, whose rights, according to Russia, it protects in the so-called “special military operation.”< br />
The process gained momentum after the Russian annexation of Crimea in 2014 and the support of separatists in the Donbass, but received new dimensions after the start of a full-scale Russian invasion on February 24.

In Kyiv, they are preparing to rename hundreds of places, to get rid of their associations with Russia. Built in the Soviet era, the monument, symbolizing the “friendship of the peoples” of Ukraine and Russia, was demolished in April to the cheers of the audience.