The tension in Peru and the closure of the border generate tension for Bolivian drug traffickers who do not receive raw materials

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The interruption of the flow of cocaine would be causing problems among drug traffickers, whose agreements are compromised by the conflict

The tension in Peru and the closure of the border generate tension for Bolivian drug traffickers who do not receive raw materials

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Humberto Vacaflor GanamFrom La Paz, Bolivia< i class="i-share-btn telegram">

The tension in Peru and the closure of the border generate tension for Bolivian drug traffickers who do not receive raw materials

Units of the Peruvian army arrived at the border between Moquegua and Puno. The border between Peru and Bolivia has been closed since early January, hampering bilateral trade, including coca and cocaine sulphate

The supply of coca leaves and of cocaine sulfate from Peruvian Amazonian territories is essential for the Bolivian drug trafficking barons to fulfill their commitments to re-export to other neighboring countries, en route to Europe.

Statistics from the United Nationsand the Bolivian government itself have verified that the volumes of drugs that leave Bolivia for the world could not be produced only with Bolivian coca. This requires the contribution of raw materials and semi-finished drugs from Peru, the second largest producer of coca in South America, after Colombia .

In normal times, this raw material and this input are treated in modern laboratories installed in national parks to produce cocaine hydrochloride, which then departs in small planes to Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay.

But now the border is closed. The interruption of that flow would be producing great tensions among the drug traffickers, who have deals that are fulfilled, yes or yes, or blood is flowing.

The former cocalero president Evo Morales and the leader Leonardo Loza, from Chapare, have not stopped expressing their solidarity with the protests by violent groups in southern Peru that have reached Lima. They continue to do so despite the protests of the government of Dina Boluarte.

The tension ;n in Peru and the closure of the border generates tension for the Bolivian drug traffickers who do not receive raw materials

Former cocalero president Evo Morales and the leader Leonardo Loza, from Chapare, have not stopped expressing their solidarity with the protests by violent groups in southern Peru (Luciano Gonzalez/Infobae)

The foreign minister himself of Bolivia, Rogelio Mayta, entered the debate and said that the Bolivian government rejects the accusations of interference made from Lima, but he did not stop lamenting the death of the rebellious Peruvians who arrived accompanied by narco-terrorists from the Maoist organization Shining Path.

All of this, with or without diplomatic friction, has kept the borderclosed between the two countries since early January, hurting bilateral trade, including coca and sulfate cocaine that arrives from Peru to Bolivia regularly, along with gold from illegal mining.

The territory of the province of Puno is the one that these loads travel through from the Amazonian river Madre de Dios to the shores of Lake Titicaca, at 4,000 meters above sea level, including those from the VRAEM, where Sendero Luminoso operates in the coca, drug and gold business.

The interference of the leaders of Chapare supports the complaints of the Peruvian government and the parliamentarians of that country who have noticed the presence of Bolivian citizens in the protests.

Some of those parliamentarians said that the Bolivians sent from Chapare carry flags called Wiphala, made of small rainbow-colored squares, like the one used by the LGBT organization striped with the same colors.

This flag was proclaimed the second flag of Bolivia by the government of Evo Morales on the grounds that it represented the native peoples of this territory when the conquistadors arrived, something that national, Peruvian and Spanish historians have denied.

The Peruvian government and politicians consider that Bolivian flag as proof of intrusion. That flag has been seen even in Lima, among those who burned buildings and beat people.

The n in Peru and the closure of the border generates tension for the Bolivian drug traffickers who do not receive raw materials

A woman waves a whipala, the second flag of Bolivia, during an ancestral ceremony in Tiwanaku for the Aymara New Year (REUTERS/Manuel Claure)

The colorful emblem has generated additional tension< /b> between the two countries. The Fujimorista legislator Juan Carlos Lizarzaburu called the Bolivian Wiphala “chifa tablecloth”, that is, a tablecloth from Lima soup kitchens where Chinese dishes are served.

< p class="paragraph">This has annoyed MAS parliamentarians, who ask the Foreign Ministry to demand that the Peruvian government apologize for having done such an offense to a national symbol, despite the fact that the Wiphala is not recognized by the majority of Bolivians. The resemblance of that flag to the one used by the LGTB is also a reason for ridicule.

Meanwhile, drug trafficking continues to produce news and tensions in Bolivia. The escape of a Brazilian drug trafficker from the Chonchocoro prisonIt has been defined by MAS deputies of the line of Evo Morales as the demonstration of the existence of an agreement between the government of Luis Arce and the São Paulo mafia Primer Comando da Capital (PCC).

The differences between the Morales and Arce currents had not reached that much until now. They accuse each other of having ties to drug trafficking, but have never so explicitly mentioned connections with foreign cartels.

Meanwhile, the presence of Peruvian troops on the border It generates nervousness and increases calls from opposition politicians and the media for the Arce government to stop the interference of Morales supporters in the Peruvian conflict.

The government de Boluarte ordered the Peruvian Armed Forces to take control of the province of Puno through a joint command with the police, due to the state of emergency.

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