The Nicaraguan regime dissolved the Association of Private Banks and outlawed another 16 NGOs

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There are already 3,223 non-governmental organizations canceled by the dictatorship of Daniel Ortega after the popular protests that broke out in April 2018

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The Nicaraguan regime dissolved the Association of Private Banks and outlawed 16 others NGO

The Nicaraguan regime dissolved the Association of Private Banks and outlawed another 16 NGOs. (REUTERS)

The regime of Daniel Ortega, through the Ministry of the Interior, canceled this Friday the legal entities of 17 other NGOs, including the Association of Private Banks of Nicaragua (Asobanp).

The outlawing of those 17 Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), all Nicaraguans, was approved by the head of the Interior of that country, María Amelia Coronel, according to an alleged ministerial agreement published in the Official Gazette La Gaceta, of Nicaragua.

With the closure of these 17 NGOs total 3,223 organizations of this type dissolved after the popular protests that broke out in April 2018.

In the case of < b>Asobanp, made up of the Banco de la Producción (Banpro), Bank of Central America (BAC), Banco Ficohsa Nicaragua(FICOHSA), Banco de Finanzas (BDF), Banco Lafise Bancentro and Banco Avanz, which had been operating since June 1994, was outlawed, according to the Nicaraguan dictatorship, for not having reported its financial statements in the period from 2020 to 2021, and for having its board of directors expire since April 2020.

In one of its last pronouncements, Asobanprejected a reform to the Law for the Protection of the Rights of Consumers and Users, approved by the Sandinista majority in the National Assembly (Parliament).

The Nicaraguan regime dissolved the Association of Private Banks and outlawed another 16 NGOs

The outlawing of these 17 Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), all Nicaraguan, was approved by the head of the Interior of that country, María Amelia Coronel, according to an alleged ministerial agreement published in the Official Gazette of Nicaragua.

This rule prohibits private banks from closing user accounts unilaterally or without notifying the cause, except in the case of drug trafficking, organized crime, money laundering and combat the financing of weapons of mass destruction.

The same legislators admitted that this law is a measure to neutralize the economic sanctions that the United States and other countries have imposed on nearly 30 Nicaraguan officials, including Ortega's wife, Rosario Murillo, and three of his associates. children, and an in-law, who is also the director of the National Police, for corruption or violation of human rights.

The Asobanp warned that said rule violates the right to free enterprise, promotes money laundering, and exposes Nicaragua to being left out of the global financial system.

The banks that operate in Nicaragua, which work with correspondent entities abroad, closed the accounts of those individuals and legal entities that have been sanctioned by the US Treasury Department.

The Ministry of the Interior argued that it closed the 17 NGOs for not having reported their financial statementss, nor their boards of directors.

The Nicaraguan regime dissolved the Association of Private Banks and outlawed others 16 NGOs

The banks that operate in Nicaragua, which work with correspondent entities abroad, closed the accounts of those individuals and legal entities that have been sanctioned by the US Treasury Department. (EFE)

The NGOs affected

Among the NGOs affected are the Nicaraguan Association of Lawyers and Notaries, Nuevas Esperanzas Association of Patients with Chronic Renal Failure, Hope and Reconciliation Association of Demobilized Patriotic Military Service of Nicaragua, Association of Retirees of the Department of León, Association of Central Market Merchants , and the Nicaraguan Music Documentary Historical Fund Association.

Sandinista deputies such as Filiberto Rodríguez have said that the NGOs involved used resources from donations< /b> they received to try to overthrow dictator Daniel Ortega during past demonstrations.

In April 2018, thousands of Nicaraguans took to the streets to protest controversial reforms to social security,which later became a demand for Ortega's resignation because he responded with force.

The Nicaraguan regime dissolved the Association of Banks Private and outlawed another 16 NGOs

Sandinista deputies such as Filiberto Rodríguez have said that the NGOs involved used resources from the donations they received to try to overthrow the dictator Daniel Ortega during past demonstrations. (EFE)

The protests left at least 355 dead according to the IACHR, although Nicaraguan organizations put the figure at 684 and while the regime acknowledges “more than 300″.

The Sandinistas have also argued that the banning of these NGOs is part of a regulation process, since not all of them the 7,227 that were registered in Nicaragua until 2018 were operating.

Nicaragua has been going through a political and social crisis since April 2018, which has worsened after the controversial general elections on November 7 2021, in which Ortega was re-elected for a fifth term, fourth in a row and second with his wife, Rosario Murillo.

(With information from EFE)

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