The head of the joint headquarters of the United States confirmed the support of Ukraine in a conversation with the Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of Ukraine

The head of the joint headquarters of the United States confirmed the support of Ukraine in a conversation with the Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of Ukraine

US Chief of Staff reaffirmed support for Ukraine in conversation with Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of Ukraine

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff of the US Armed Forces, General Mark A. Milley (file photo)   The head of the US Joint Staff confirmed Ukraine's support in a conversation with the Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of Ukraine

The commanders of the United States and Ukraine exchanged views by phone on the current state of the war in Ukraine amid reports of new shelling of civilian targets by Russia, as a result of which Ukrainian civilians continue to die

Dave Butler, spokesman for the Joint Committee, reported on a telephone conversation that took place on Friday between the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff of the US Armed Forces, General Mark Milley, and the Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of Ukraine, General Valery Zaluzhny.

Butler said the two countries' chiefs of staff discussed Russia's unprovoked and ongoing invasion of Ukraine and exchanged views and assessments. The senior US general reaffirmed his “unwavering support for Ukraine's sovereignty and territorial integrity” to his colleague.

“Ukraine is a key NATO partner and is firmly committed to national sovereignty and democratic principles,” the Joint Committee spokesman said in a statement.

Attacks on trains in Ukraine may be considered war crimes

The talks came after an artillery attack on Chaplino, a small village in southeastern Ukraine, by Russian forces last Wednesday.

A train station was targeted, killing more than 20 people . This attack is the latest in a series of strikes by Russian troops on the country's railway system. According to many experts in the field of international law, such strikes can be considered war crimes.

“A train station is generally a civilian facility and should not be targeted,” said Jennifer Trahan, a professor at New York University's Center for Global Affairs.

Deputy Head of the Office of the President of Ukraine Kyrylo Tymoshenko said on Thursday that an 11-year-old boy died under the rubble of a neighboring house, and a 6-year-old child died as a result of a car fire near the station.

Tatyana Kvitnitskaya, deputy head of the Dnepropetrovsk regional health department, said that many victims of the Russian strike on Wednesday received craniocerebral injuries, broken limbs, burns and shrapnel wounds.

“There is no such war crime that the Russian invaders have not yet committed on the territory of Ukraine,” President of Ukraine Volodymyr Zelensky said Wednesday in a speech to the UN Security Council.

While Moscow began to claim that the train was targeted because it allegedly carried Ukrainian troops and equipment on Wednesday, witnesses of the incident say they did not notice any visible signs that Ukrainian servicemen were among the dead.

The Russian Ministry of Defense stated that an Iskander missile was used to carry out the strike, and that 200 reservists were allegedly “destroyed on the way to the combat zone.”

Even if there were some among the dead servicemen, the attack still violates the laws of war, as it caused disproportionate damage to the civilian population of Ukraine, experts in the West say.

“If you're going to kill a small number of military personnel and kill a large number of civilians, that's a war crime,” said Michael Newton, professor at Vanderbilt University School of Law.

“Iskander missiles are expensive missiles with precision guidance, and they are not used for trivial tasks,” said Frank Ledwidge, a former British military intelligence officer. on high alert due to threats that Russia will use this opportunity to organize attacks.

In the six months since Russia's invasion of Ukraine, experts have collected independent evidence of 39 attacks by the Russian army on civilian infrastructure, which could be considered war crimes. Three of these attacks targeted the country's railway infrastructure and proved particularly deadly, causing the deaths of over a hundred civilians.