The Bolivian Justice will decide on January 24 whether Jeanine Áñez will go to ordinary or parliamentary trial

Spread the love

Although the ruling Movement for Socialism (MAS) has a majority in Parliament, a vote of opposition forces is needed to reach two-thirds necessary to activate a liability lawsuit

The Justice of Bolivia will decide next January 24 if Jeanine Áñez will go to ordinary or parliamentary trial

The Justice of Bolivia will decide on January 24 whether Jeanine Áñez will go to ordinary or parliamentary trial. (AFP)

A Bolivian judge will define in a hearing set for next January 24 whether the former interim president Jeanine Áñez will be prosecuted by ordinary means or a trial of responsibilities for the deaths of at least a dozen civilians during the crisis of 2019.

The Minister of Justice , Iván Lima, stated this Thursday that a el Alto court magistrate, a neighboring city of La Paz, “has answered” the request of that State portfolio and defined a hearing to discuss the jurisdiction of the case for the Senkata massacre.

“We hope that on Tuesday (…) a definitive decision will be taken that will give peace of mind to the Bolivian people and the victims, within the framework of due process,” the minister remarked.

severe and mild, related to death of civilians in clashes between the security forces and the groups of protesters when Áñez assumed the Presidency of the country.

This judicial act is contrary to the accusatory proposal that in 2021 presented the Attorney General, Juan Lanchipa, to Parliament so that Áñez can be prosecuted as a former president in a process of responsibilities.

Lima accused the leaders of the opposition women Citizen Community, of former president Carlos Mesa, and Creemos, of the governor of Santa Cruz, Luis Fernando Camacho, now detained for the events of the crisis of 2019, of not wanting to give “justice to the Bolivian people”.

Bolivian Justice will decide on January 24th whether Jeanine Áñez will go to ordinary or parliamentary trial

Last Tuesday learned of the expansion of the accusation in the Senkata case to the former interim president for the crimes of genocide, homicide and serious and minor injuries, related to the death of civilians in clashes between the security forces and groups of protesters when Áñez took office. Presidency of the country. (AFP)

Despite the fact that the ruler Movement Toward Socialism (MAS) has a majority in Parliament, the vote of the opposition forces is needed to reach the two-thirds necessary to activate a trial of responsibilities.

Minister Lima also pointed out that the request made is part of “the mandate” of the Interdisciplinary Group of Independent Experts (GIEI) and that that “the Sacaba and Senkata massacres should be investigated”.

Áñez's lawyers objected to the accusation through ordinary channels and stated that they will raise the necessary resources to avoid that channel, considering that “a trial of responsibilities corresponds to her.”

The former president said that she will ignore and reject the courts and prosecutors “without competence”, something that she also stated in a hearing at the beginning of the year for the ordinary process that is followed for an alleged < b>irregular designation in the Bolivian Food Company(EBA), when she dispensed with her lawyers.

Áñez has been detained since March 2021 in a prison in La Paz, initially accused of terrorism , sedition and conspiracy in the case that became known as “coup d'état I”.

Bolivian Justice will decide on January 24th whether Jeanine Áñez will go to ordinary or parliamentary trial

Áñez has been detained since March 2021 in a prison in La Paz, initially accused of terrorism, sedition and conspiracy in the case that became known as “coup d'état I”. (AFP)

Then the “coup d'état II” process was opened against her accusing her of the crimes of resolutions against the Constitution and breach of duty , for which a judge sentenced her to 10 years in prison for the way in which she placed herself in the line of presidential succession after the resignation of Morales and the other authorities that followed him.

For the ruling party, the 2019 protests were a “coup” against former president Evo Morales, while for the opposition they were due to electoral fraud in the frustrated elections that year.

(With information from EFE)

Continue reading:

Previous Article
Next Article

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *