Scientists told whether repeated vaccinations against COVID-19 are needed

Scientists told whether repeated vaccinations against COVID-19 are needed

A study by Yale University in Charlotte shows that peak levels of antibodies from mRNA vaccines exceed those achieved with natural infection.

Scientists told whether booster shots against COVID-19 are needed

< p id="caption-attachment-631983" class="wp-caption-text">Gestellte Aufnahme. Symbolfoto: Coronavirus Diagnosis. COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2. Berlin 17.03.2020 Berlin Deutschland *** Presented picture Symbol photo Coronavirus Diagnosis COVID 19, SARS CoV 2 Berlin 17 03 2020 Berlin Germany Copyright: xThomasxImo/photothek.netxGestellte Aufnahme. Symbolfoto: Coronavirus Diagnosis. COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2. Berlin 17.03.2020 Berlin Deutschland *** Presented picture Symbol photo Coronavirus Diagnosis COVID 19, SARS CoV 2 Berlin 17 03 2020 Berlin Germany Copyright: xThomasxImo/photothek.netx

Coronavirus vaccine boosters are critical to maintaining the body's immunity to infection, repeated in a new Yale School of Public Health study that shows vaccinated people are more protected from reinfection than unvaccinated and cured COVID-19.

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The research team used a variety of comparisons of evolutionary approaches to better understand how long immunity to COVID-19 lasts after receiving an mRNA vaccine or a booster. They also assessed the likelihood of future infections over time.

The study, published in the peer-reviewed journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, looked at Pfizer, Moderna—both mRNA vaccines—and AstraZeneca and Johnson & ; Johnson – both viral vector vaccines – tracking the levels of antibodies produced by each vaccine in turn, as opposed to natural infection.

The study found that while mRNA vaccines produce more antibodies at peak output and therefore provide more protection than natural infection, viral vector vaccines produce approximately the same amount of antibodies as natural infection at peak output.

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This means that AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson is expected to “provide lower and shorter-term protection against breakthrough infection.” More specifically, mRNA vaccines provide almost three times the duration of protection compared to viral vector vaccines.

As strong as these vaccines are, the protection is short-lived. Thus, to achieve reliable protection against re-infection, it is necessary to keep up with re-vaccinations, especially those that are specially adapted to deal with new variants of the virus.

“We are in an arms race with this virus. They will develop ways to evade both our natural and any vaccine-induced immune response. As we have seen with the Omicron variant, vaccines against early strains of the virus are becoming less effective against new strains of the virus,” said Alex Dornburg, associate professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, co-author of the study.

Indeed, the Omicron variant evaded protect the body from previous vaccinations in a way that previous options could not, and caused an extremely aggressive fifth wave of the pandemic at the end of 2021.