Scientists have identified a mineral on the moon that provokes rust

Scientists have identified a mineral on the moon that provokes rust

Scientists representing the University of Hawaii at Manoa, during the study, discovered the mineral hematite on the moon, which also exists on Earth. It is able to form during the oxidation of iron, but this requires water and air, which are absent on the natural satellite of the Blue Planet.

Scientists have identified a mineral on the moon that provokes rust

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However, this finding is not the only reason why the researchers decided to study the “deposit” of the mineral. Hydrogen from solar winds can be detected on the moon. Because of this, the Earth's satellite is capable of absorbing a large number of electrons. However, if the material is capable of oxidizing, it loses negatively charged particles. As a result, the solar wind prevents the occurrence of “rust”. For this reason, experts cannot understand how the mineral was formed on the moon. They identified a stock of hematite in data collected by India's Chandrayan 1 lunar orbiter. Scientists using spectroscopic analysis of the moon have determined the composition of the minerals on its surface. Hematite forms on the Earth-facing side of the satellite.

Experts point out that the mineral is formed by the oxidation of iron with oxygen formed from the upper layers of the earth's atmosphere. With a full moon, the Earth's satellite is in the Blue Planet's magnetosphere. Then 99% of the solar winds do not hit the moon. At this time, oxidation occurs, as a result of which the Earth's satellite “rusts” for billions of years. At the same time, hematite was not found on the other side of the moon, where terrestrial oxygen is most likely absent. The formation of the mineral in this area is due to the tiny drops of water that are revealed at the height.

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