Registrations in Miami-Dade schools skyrocketed due to the arrival of new migrants

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They are children from families mostly from Cuba, Haiti, Nicaragua and Venezuela

Registrations in Miami-Dade schools skyrocketed due to the arrival of new migrants

By

Soledad CedroFrom Miami, Florida, United States

Registrations in Miami-Dade schools skyrocketed due to the arrival of new migrants

So far this school year, there are more than 10,000 migrant children who entered the public school system in Miami (EFE)

In Miami-Dade County, classes start at the end of August and the school year lasts until June of next year. The registration of children must be done at least six months before, but in the public school system they have an obligation to take any child who moves to the area, even in the middle of the school year.

Since the beginning of the 2022-2023 school year, more than 10,000 students from Cuba, Haiti, Venezuela and Nicaragua have been enrolled in the Miami-Dade County public school system. In half a school year, there are already 2,500 more students from these countries than were registered in the entire 2021-2022 school year.

In total, this school year the district has already welcomed more than 14,700 new students from migrant families from around the world. This is a complex situation since post-pandemic, there is a shortage of teachers in all the big cities of the country.

“All this is a perfect storm. During the last few years we have experienced a lack of human capital. And now we have many more children to serve,” Mari Tere Rojas, a member of the Miami-Dade County School Board, complained during one of the meetings.

Registrations in Miami-Dade schools skyrocketed due to the arrival of new migrants

Most of these students come from Cuba, Venezuela, Nicaragua and Haiti (EFE/Celeste Rodas)

Between August 17, 2022 (the date the school year began) through January 10, 2023, 14,723 new students entered the Miami Public School system. Of these, 9,935 come from Cuba, Haiti, Nicaragua and Venezuela, the countries from which an increase in migration has been observed in recent months due to the chaos that exists there. The rest of the students come from another 20 countries, including Argentina, Colombia, Honduras, Mexico, Peru, Russia and the Ukraine.

The issue was discussed at the first School Board meeting of the year. Rojas had asked for specific data on migrant children and they discussed how to deal with the situation. Among other things, most of the migrant children usually do not speak English, so the school must make leveling courses available, incurring another extra expense that must be discussed by the authorities.

As has been widely reported, the number of migrants has increased substantially as of October 2022. Since that date, thousands of children have arrived at Miami schools.

As of October 11, the district had reported 9,864 students who had entered the school system after immigrating to the area. By December 22, the number increased to 12,978.

At no point is there a debate not to provide services to these children, but rather how to manage the budget to face all the new expenses.< /p>

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