Ready for the apocalypse: the most valuable music in the world will be preserved on special plates

Ready for the apocalypse: the most valuable music in the world will be preserved on special plates

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 Ready for the apocalypse: the most valuable music in the world will be preserved on special plates

The Elire Group, together with Microsoft, began recording music on quartz plates to save them in case of a global catastrophe. Details are published on the official website of the project, which is called the Global Music Vault.

The engineers decided to create a durable and reliable storage of information that can accommodate a huge collection of music from around the world. Project Silica was chosen as the recording technology, which encodes digital data in quartz glass using a laser. The beams create layers of three-dimensional gratings and deform the material at different depths and at different angles. A specially trained artificial intelligence will be able to decode and reproduce the data.

Researchers have yet to figure out if music can be recorded using Project Silica's technology and how it will be stored inside the glass. Silicon dioxide or simply quartz is very durable and inert, that is, it does not enter into any chemical reactions, and therefore can withstand almost any environmental impact. Each platter is 75 x 75 mm in circumference and 2 mm thick and holds up to 100 GB of data. In theory, it can retain data for thousands of years.

“The plate can be baked, boiled, cleaned, soaked in water, subjected to electromagnetic pulses and otherwise attempted to be damaged, but this will not affect the data recorded on glass", — the press service noted.

The organizers of the project promise to perpetuate the most important and valuable works in glass. First, they intend to record “a variety of musical expressions from around the world”, which includes the work of British artist Beaty Wolfe, songs awarded by the Swedish Polar Music Prize, the Alexander Turnbull library from New Zealand and the International Library of African Music. The first data is planned to be recorded in 2023 and tens of petabytes (1 million gigabytes) will be added every year.

The music collection on a quartz chip will be hidden in the so-called Doomsday Vault in the Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard, which is considered the safest place on Earth due to a combination of geological and geopolitical stability. Here, under the Arctic mountain, seeds of 145,693 varieties of plants are already stored, which can be grown after the global catastrophe.

Previously, Microsoft developed a new method for writing and reading information in DNA format. Scientists believe that in the future, the technology will allow the creation of a commercial DNA repository for scientific purposes.

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