New York adopts new laws in its endless war against rats

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There will be new regulations about the hours that garbage and debris can remain on the sidewalks

New York enacts new laws in its never-ending war on rats

Rats on the sidewalk on Pearl St., New York

New York Mayor Eric Adams, today signed four bills into law, as part of his declared war against the abundant rats that swarm this city, which include new regulations on the hours that garbage and debris can remain on the sidewalks.

“I've made it clear, I hate rats. And we are going to kill some,” he said before signing the bills, approved by the municipal council.

The new laws require the Department of Health to create the “ reduction zones” of rodents no later than April 1, 2023. This agency must also issue a report each year on the measures it implemented for this purpose and those it plans for each area, as well as public outreach efforts.

Also that the Cleaning Department establish the time in which buildings must dispose of their garbage and recycling for collection.

Among the new laws New large construction projects will also be required to hire a “exterminator” before the city issues you a construction permit and rat-prone buildings use rodent-resistant dumpsters.

“I'm proud to sign four bills to help to create a cleaner and more welcoming city. This legislation redoubles our efforts and is another important step in reducing the rodent population. Rat-free streets are vital to vibrant neighborhoods and to our city's economic recovery,” he stated.

New York adopts new laws in its endless war against rats

The Cleaning Department must establish the time in which buildings must dispose of their garbage and recycling for collection (CreditStephen Speranza for The New York Times)

“I thank the Council for helping to keep our city sparkling clean,” said Adams, who last month announced a change to reduce the amount of time trash bags spend on the sidewalk (from 8 p.m., four hours later than before) and signed it into law today.

According to a recent report on Adams' first six months in office, the number of streets classified as “Acceptably” clean decreased by 4% compared to the same period last year. Calls to report sightings of rodents and litter on the sidewalks also increased.

“People are concerned about excessive rat sightings in their community and the infestation and actually the anxiety it generates,” he said, noting that New Yorkers and businesses are costing millions of dollars to deal with this crisis.

Rats are visible on subway tracks, in basements of buildings, in parks and on any street where Garbage bags are piling up. It is common to see signs warning against littering with the message that it can turn the area into “a five-star rat restaurant”.

“Reduction zones do not give people rats a safe place, and the tools in these bills allow us all to send the rats packing up” to leave New York, said Department of Cleanup Commissioner Jessica Tisch.

< p class="paragraph">(With information from EFE)

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