Most of the G20 countries condemned the Russian invasion of Ukraine in the draft of the final declaration

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The text, which still needs to be approved by leaders before its official release at the end of the summit on Wednesday, also calls for an extension of the agreement to export Ukrainian grains and judges the use of nuclear weapons or threats to resort to them “inadmissible”

Most of the G20 countries condemned the Russian invasion of Ukraine in the draft of the final declaration

Indonesian President Joko Widodo (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)

A “majority” of G20 member countries strongly condemns the Russian invasion of Ukraine and highlights its devastatinghuman consequences and for the global economy, according to the draft of the joint declaration whose approval is scheduled at the summit being held in Bali.

The text, in principle preliminarily accepted by all members of the group including Russia, also calls for an extension of the agreement to export Ukrainian grains and judges “inadmissible” the use of nuclear weapons or threats to resort to them.

The document highlights the “immense human suffering”and the problems it entails on a global scale in terms of energy supply, food security or risks to financial instability, although it also echoes the different positions on the matter among the twenty countries.

The almost nine months of Russian invasion of the Ukraine caused a disastrous increase in food prices and the energy worldwide, impoverishing millions of people and spreading the shadow of famine.

Ukraine is one of the world's top grain producers, but had up to 20 million tons of grain blocked in its ports in the wake of Russia's invasion. An agreement reached in July with the intervention of the UN and Turkey allowed exports to resume, but this pact expires on November 19 and the draft statement calls for its extension.

The document, which still needs to be approved by the leaders before its official release at the end of the summit on Wednesday, ensures that “the present time cannot be a time of war”.

Most of the G20 countries condemned the Russian invasion of Ukraine in the draft of the final declaration

US President Joe Biden listens to his Indian counterpart Narendra Modi during the summit (Dita Alangkara via REUTERS)

The statement acknowledges that there were “other points of view” and that the “G20 is not the forum to resolve security issues”, but its members acknowledge that these issues “have significant consequences for the global economy”.

The statement that must be still agreed by the G20 leadersbetween today's session and this Wednesday's is in line with what was advanced by representatives of the European Union and the United States, promoters of a clear and firm condemnation of Moscow in this forum.

The President of the European Council, Charles Michel, stressed today that the final text that the G20 delegations are still working on goes “in the right direction” to condemn the Russian invasion of Ukraine despite the different positions among its members.

“The fact of having reached an agreement at the level of delegations is already a great achievement,” Michel said at a press conference shortly before the start of the G20 summit, “one of the most difficult that has ever been”, according to what he said .

No G20 ministerial meeting since Russia invaded Ukraine in February this year has produced a consensus document due to differences between members when it comes to including allusions to the conflict and in what terms to do so.

Russia officially refers to its invasion of Ukraine as a “special military operation”, which made it difficult to even mention the “war” in Ukraine in multilateral declarations.

(With information from EFE and AFP)

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