More than six hours in two days for the second longest match in Roland Garros history

More than six hours in two days for the second longest match in Roland Garros history

Giustino's victory over Moutet (0-6, 7-6 [7], 7-6 [3], 2-6, 18-16) is only behind Santoro's triumph over Clement.

More than six hours in two days for the second longest match in Roland Garros history

Lorenzo Giustino beat Corentin Moutet in the first round at Roland Garros in the second longest match in the history of the Paris tournament. The Italian, coming from the previous one, prevailed in six hours and five minutes (0-6, 7-6 [7], 7-6 [3], 2-6, 18-16) to win his first victory in a Grand Slam.

The duel, played on Court 14, had to be interrupted on Sunday because of the rain, with 4-3 in the third set. Then, no one could imagine the dramatic outcome, with a fifth set where there were 11 service breaks.

Paradoxically, the global statistics smiled at the loser, as Moutet added 25 more points throughout the clash (242-217), landed more winners (88-57) and made fewer unforced errors (88-96). However, his inability to decide in crucial moments ended up deciding victory in favor of his rival.

16 years later

Giustino, who will now face Diego Schwartzman in the second round, managed to get out of several critical situations, such as when he delivered his serve for a threatening 6-7, 13-14 and 14-15 in the light. Despite his 29 years, his experience on clay in ATP tournaments was reduced to five hours on the track. This time, the six employees before Moutet opened the path to victory for him.

In the centuries-old history of Roland Garros, only one longer match had been recorded. It was in 2004, when Fabrice Santoro defeated Arnaud Clement in six hours and 33 minutes (6-4, 6-3, 6-7 [5], 3-6, 16-14).

The 365 minutes used by Giustino place this match in eighth place in the historical ranking in the Open Era. At the top of that ladder continues John Isner's triumph over Nicolas Mahut at Wimbledon 2010 (6-4, 3-6, 6-7 [7], 7-6 [3], 70-68). Fourth position includes the most recent, when Kevin Anderson knocked Isner down at Wimbledon 2018 (7-6 [6], 6-7 [5], 6-7 [9], 6-4, 26-24).

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