Fri. Mar 1st, 2024

Meta offers $51M to users of 4 provinces to settle a class action

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Meta did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the regulations.

Radio-Canada

Speech synthesis, based on artificial intelligence, makes it possible to generate spoken text from written text.

Meta offers to offer 51 million dollars to Facebook users from British Columbia, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Newfoundland and Labrador to settle a class action over the “Sponsored Stories” advertising program.

Names and photos of people were used without their knowledge through this program which existed between 2011 and 2014.

When a person gave the mention I like a product on the platform, Facebook generated a news feed of his endorsement using his name and profile photo without informing him.

A lawsuit was filed by a British Columbia woman in 2019 and this lawsuit was expanded to other Canadian provinces to include residents of Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Newfoundland and Labrador.< /p>

Christopher Rhone is a lawyer with Branch MacMaster in Vancouver and represents the interests of Canadians in this legal action.

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He says that large companies specializing in the social media sector are often not based in Canada, but want to expand their operations there. operations.

It is important for them to review and take into account the privacy rights of individuals and residents of Canadian provinces before engage in their work here, he says.

This multi-million dollar settlement proposed by Meta sends a message to businesses about the importance of pay attention to state privacy laws.

A quote from Christopher Rhone, attorney at Branch MacMaster

In a judgment rendered in 2022, a judge of the Supreme Court of British Columbia indicated that the plaintiffs had not expressly or implicitly given their consent for Facebook to use their image in its sponsored program.

MNP Ltd., the court-appointed administrator to manage the proposed settlement, says the deal must be approved by the British Columbia Supreme Court justice in March, and proceedings must be initiated. place to determine the distribution of this money to each plaintiff.

The settlement indicates that Facebook will pay the aggregate sum of $51 million in exchange for' a total and definitive waiver of any legal proceedings in this category in the future, writes MNP in a press release published Thursday.

According to MNP Ltd, the plaintiffs cannot yet claim their compensation.

Once the settlement is approved, the claims procedure will be announced to allow plaintiffs to submit their claims for compensation, says the administrator.

Last year, Meta reached a $725 million settlement with U.S. Facebook users over privacy issues.

Evidence showed that users' personal information was given to Cambridge Analytica, a company that helped Donald Trump's 2016 election campaign.

Lawyers estimate that nearly 4.3 million Canadians could be eligible for this regulation.

Since there is no database to To know concretely who the people whose information was used in these ads are, Mr. Rhone and his team are working under the assumption that almost everyone who was at least somewhat active on Facebook could have been in a sponsored article.

Anyone who wants to challenge Facebook's proposed deal has until March 11 to do so.

With information from The Canadian Press

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