Inflation and the future of democracy boosted voters and so did the Trump-Biden feud

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Americans who went to the polls on Tuesday are divided on whether Biden's policies caused the price increase, or if it was outside factors to their control, such as the Russian invasion of Ukraine

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Josh Boak and Hannah Fingerhut – Associated Press

Inflation and the future of democracy boosted voters and so did the Trump-Biden dispute

Inflation and democracy stimulate voters voters, also the Trump-Biden. (REUTERS)

High inflation and fears about the health of democracy weighed heavily on American voters in the midterm elections , where those who were -and perhaps are- rivals for the White House, Joe Biden and Donald Trump, cast a shadow, according to AP VoteCast.

The poll shows a country in trouble at a time when control by Congress< /b> -and the choice between very contrasting visions of the United States- hang in the balance. Much of the country is mired in pessimism about the future of the United States and its political leadership, with lingering tensions over how people feel about the current president and his predecessor determining elections in the polls.

The detailed portrait of the American electorate is based on preliminary results from VoteCast, a comprehensive survey of more than 90,000 voters from across the country conducted for The Associated Press by NORC at the University of Chicago.

About half of the voters b>they say that inflationhas significantly influenced his decision, as the prices of food, gasoline, housing and other expenses have skyrocketed in the last year, giving Republicans a vehicle to criticize Biden.

The economy was a top concern for voters, with 8 out of 10 saying it was in bad shape state, since inflation, close to the maximum of 40 years ago, has raised fears of a recession. Voters are divided on whether Biden's policies caused the price increase, or were factors beyond his control, such as the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

< img class="aligncenter" src="/wp-content/uploads/2022/11/inflation-and-the-future-of-democracy-boosted-voters-and-so- dispute-trump-biden-ba4f5c0.jpg" alt="Inflation and the future of democracy boosted voters and so did the Trump-Biden dispute" />

The economy was a top concern for voters, with 8 in 10 saying it was in bad shape as inflation near 40-year highs has raised fears of a recession. (REUTERS)

A slightly lower number of voters – 44% – say the future of democracy was their main consideration. On the campaign trail, Biden warned that Republicans pose a threat to democracy.

Many Republican Party leaderscontinue to question the US electoral systemfalsely claiming that the 2020 presidential election, which Trump lost, was rigged.

However, the Make America Great Again movement, sparked by Trump appears to have tightened his grip on Republicans. Nearly two-thirds of Republican Party voters say they support the MAGA movement, a sign of Biden's potential deadlock with the White House if Republicans win a majority in the House or Senate.

Republicans are counting on voter discontent with inflation, crime and immigration to help them take control of both houses of Congress. Biden and his fellow Democrats have argued that the American middle class is poised for a renaissance thanks to its investments in infrastructure, computer chip production, and clean energy projects.

Inflation and the future of democracy boosted voters and so did the Trump-Biden dispute

The “Make America Great Again” movement unleashed by Trump appears to have tightened his grip on Republicans. Nearly two-thirds of GOP voters say they support the MAGA movement, a sign of Biden's potential lock-in with the White House if Republicans win a majority in the House or Senate. (REUTERS)

Voters in both parties see inflation and the fate of democracy as important. However, Republicans are more likely to rank the economy as the main factor in their vote, while Democrats are more likely to prioritize the future of democracy.

Voters have become increasingly demoralized as the country's political divisions have hardened. Roughly three-quarters say the country is headed in the wrong direction. That number is higher than in the VoteCast survey of voters in 2020, at the height of the coronavirus pandemic.

Two years ago , the COVID-19 pandemic was considered the main problem in the country; now only 2% of voters name him as the top priority, as other issues have taken center stage.

Biden's election was due in part to the view that the pandemic was out of control under Trump's leadership, VoteCast showed. Most voters said he thought he “cares about people like them.” A smaller percentage of 2022 voters say the same thing.

Even Democrats harbor doubts about Biden , who has said he plans to run for re-election in 2024. Nearly a third of voters for Democratic candidates for Congress say that Biden is not a strong leader. One in five Democrats say he lacks the mental capacity to serve effectively as president. And about 3 in 10 disapprove of his economic leadership.

Inflation and the future of democracy boosted voters and so did the Trump-Biden dispute

Biden's election was due in part to the view that the pandemic was out of control under Trump's leadership, VoteCast showed. Most voters said he thought he “cares about people like them.” A smaller percentage of 2022 voters say the same. (REUTERS)

The 2020 presidential election still looms over these congressional, state, and local elections. Nearly two-thirds of Democratic voters said they voted to show their opposition to Trump, while about 7 in 10 Republican voters said their votes were to challenge Biden.

Inflation has been a clear blow to the well-being of many Americans. A third of voters describe their families as falling behind financially. That's nearly double the percentage of the electorate who said the same thing two years ago.

Nearly half of suburban voters backed Democrats nationally, slightly fewer than in 2020 and 2018. Democrats continue to do better with women, while men are more likely to prefer Republicans. Voters under 45 tend to favor Democrats; older voters generally lean Republican.

Faced with economic headwinds, Biden and many Democratic candidates tried to tap into their base's outrage after the Court Supreme Court overturned abortion protections in Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that enshrines the right to abortion. Overall, 7 in 10 voters say the ruling was a major factor in their midterm decisions.

(With information from The Associated Press)

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