Mon. Jul 22nd, 2024

In Prince Rupert, 19 eagles die after 'substance' dumped in landfill

Natasha Kumar By Natasha Kumar Mar5,2024

À Prince Rupert, 19 eagles dead after “substance” dumped in landfill” /></p>
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<p class=In this screenshot taken from a video from 2018, we can see numerous bald eagles in the Prince Rupert landfill. (Archive photo)

Radio-Canada

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The City of Prince Rupert announced Friday the death of 19 bald eagles after someone dumped a “ unknown “deleterious substance” in local landfill.

The City explained that it was investigating this spill and trying to identify the substance. The cleanup began the day the substance was discovered.

In a press release, the City indicates that it also called on an environmental consultant for the #x27;help identify the substance and develop a long-term action plan.

The City has confirmed that the spill occurred at the landfill's liquid collection site. The substance was contained in a pond without spreading elsewhere. The devastating death of the eagles troubled landfill employees, according to the City.

The city says it is working with the provincial Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy, as well as the federal Ministry of Environment and Climate Change, to prevent a tragedy like this from happening again.

An awareness campaign to warn the public of the dangers of dumping certain substances is in progress.

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Radio-Canada/CBC contacted the two departments for more information, but they did not comment for the moment.

Arnie Nagy, who runs the Prince Rupert Wildlife Rehab Shelter, called the news shocking. He hopes that a thorough investigation will be carried out and that measures will be taken to trace the person or persons responsible for the dumping of the substance.

With information from The Canadian Press andRandi-Marie Adams

Natasha Kumar

By Natasha Kumar

Natasha Kumar has been a reporter on the news desk since 2018. Before that she wrote about young adolescence and family dynamics for Styles and was the legal affairs correspondent for the Metro desk. Before joining The Times Hub, Natasha Kumar worked as a staff writer at the Village Voice and a freelancer for Newsday, The Wall Street Journal, GQ and Mirabella. To get in touch, contact me through my natasha@thetimeshub.in 1-800-268-7116

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