Göltschtalbrücke – the world’s largest brick bridge (photo) |  Germany Information and Travel Tips |  >

Göltschtalbrücke – the world’s largest brick bridge (photo) | Germany Information and Travel Tips | >

Share Button

Göltschtalbrücke – the world’s largest brick bridge (photo) |  Germany Information and Travel Tips |  >

Milau • Göltzschtalbrücke – not only a very beautiful viaduct in Germany, but also the world’s largest brick bridge. Exactly 170 years ago, on July 15, 1851, the first train passed along it – the grand opening took place. Below we have collected a few modern photographs and images on old postcards, but first, a few more interesting facts about this architectural landmark, which still regularly fulfills its purpose.

Monument to engineering and architectural art

More than 26 million bricks were used in the construction of this almost 580-meter bridge in the valley of the Golch River in 1846-1851. The construction site of the century employed more than 1,700 workers. Some old sources give slightly different figures – more than 20 million bricks and 1,500 workers, but at the same time, the cost of construction is indicated with accuracy, so to speak, to a penny – 6,599,621 marks and 62 pfennigs! Bricks were produced in twenty small factories, which were located along the railroad under construction between Saxony and Bavaria, more precisely – Leipzig and Nuremberg.

Göltschtalbrücke has a total of 29 spans and almost 100 arches. Height – 78 meters. At the time of opening, it was also the tallest railway bridge in the world. Included in the list of historical monuments of engineering and architectural art in Germany.

Gölchtalbrücke Bridge. Photos and Videos

See also:

  • The most famous bridges in Europe

    Rialto bridge, Venice

    The Rialto is the oldest stone bridge in Venice, one of the four bridges over the Grand Canal. It replaced its less durable wooden predecessors at the end of the 16th century. The structure that has stood to this day is supported by 12 thousand oak piles driven into the bottom of the lagoon. Small shops still work in the arched gallery on the bridge.

  • The most famous bridges in Europe

    Ponte Vecchio, Florence

    The Ponte Vecchio, the oldest arch bridge in Florence, was completed in 1345. It has survived in its original form; once it housed butcher shops, in the 16th century they were replaced by jewelers. Above the bridge is the Vasari Corridor. It was built specifically so that the Duke of Tuscan could easily pass from one of his palaces to another, located on the left bank of the Arno.

  • The most famous bridges in Europe

    Tower Bridge, London

    The most famous drawbridge in the world, Tower Bridge, built in the Victorian Gothic style at the end of the 19th century, was named so because of its proximity to the Tower of Fortress. As conceived by the architects, the galleries located in the upper tier of the bridge at a height of 44 meters allowed pedestrians to cross the Thames, regardless of whether the bridge was raised or not. Then the bridge was raised up to 50 times a day, today – 4-5 times a week.

  • The most famous bridges in Europe

    Bank Bridge, St. Petersburg

    Of all the bridges in St. Petersburg, we chose the Bankovsky Bridge – a small chain pedestrian bridge across the Griboyedov Canal. This is an outstanding architectural monument. It got its name thanks to the building of the Assignation Bank, which was located nearby. The bridge is best known for the figures of winged lions. These mythical figures were made by the sculptor Pavel Sokolov. By the way, he also created the lions on the Lion Bridge.

  • The most famous bridges in Europe

    Karlov Bridge, Prague

    The construction of the Charles Bridge across the Vltava, connecting Prague Castle and the Old Town, was started in 1357 by order of the Czech and German king, Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV, whose name he bears The stone bridge is 520 meters long and is decorated with thirty statues. The most famous is the figure of the Catholic Saint John of Nepomutsky: he brings good luck to everyone who touches him.

  • The most famous bridges in Europe

    Kapellbrücke, Lucerne

    The Kapellbrücke (ie “Chapel Bridge”), built in 1332 in Lucerne, over the Reuss River, is considered the oldest wooden covered bridge in Europe. Under the roof of the gallery of the pedestrian bridge, which was originally used as part of the defensive fortification around the city, scenes from the history of Switzerland are placed in the form of 111 triangular paintings.

  • The most famous bridges in Europe

    Shopkeepers’ Bridge, Erfurt

    Bridge or street? Perhaps both. Originally wooden, later from the 14th century, the stone Shopkeepers’ Bridge (Krämerbrücke) is one of the main attractions of the German city of Erfurt. It suffered from floods and fires many times, it was restored and rebuilt. The houses on the bridge contain residential apartments, shops and art galleries.

  • The most famous bridges in Europe

    Pont-Neuf, Paris

    Surprisingly, the Parisian Pont Neuf, erected at the beginning of the 17th century, literally means “New Bridge”. However, then it became an architectural innovation: contrary to the then prevailing traditions, it was left free – without a roof and without buildings. On the bridge stood a bronze statue of King Henry IV, which was smashed during the French Revolution and thrown into the Seine. But later they cast a new one and put it back on.

  • The most famous bridges in Europe

    Glenfinnan Viaduct, Scotland

    This railway bridge became famous all over the world thanks to the adaptation of the Harry Potter novels: the fabulous express to Hogwarts followed the Glenfinnan viaduct. The longest (about 380 meters) concrete viaduct in Scotland, consisting of 21 arched spans, was opened in 1901. This is the first bridge of its kind built entirely of concrete.

  • The most famous bridges in Europe

    Three bridges of Edinburgh

    Three bridges across the Firth of Forth at once connect the Scottish capital Edinburgh with the north-east of the country. The railway (red) bridge, which became one of the first cantilever bridges in the world, opened in 1890. The Fort Road Bridge was built in 1964 and the state-of-the-art Queensferry Crossing cable-stayed bridge was built in 2017.

    By Inga Wanner, Elizabeth York von Wartenburg


Share Button
Enterteiment