EU and NATO plan to tighten control over weapons supplied to Ukraine

EU and NATO plan to tighten control over weapons supplied to Ukraine

Europol said in April that its investigations showed that the importation of weapons from Ukraine to the bloc to supply organized criminal groups had begun and posed a potential threat to EU security.

The EU and NATO plan to tighten control over weapons supplied to Ukraine

NATO and EU countries insist on improving the tracking system for the weapons they supplied to Ukraine due to fears that they were being taken out of the country to the European black market.

This is reported by the Financial Times.

Since Russia launched a full-scale war against Ukraine, Western states have provided more than $10 billion in military aid ranging from man-portable rocket launchers and armored personnel carriers to rifles and ammunition.

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A number of NATO member states are in discussions with Kyiv about some form of tracking system or detailed inventories of weapons shipped to Ukraine, FT sources said. The Ukrainian government is building a more extensive weapons monitoring and tracking system with the participation of Western countries.

“All these weapons land in southern Poland, are brought to the border, and then simply distributed to vehicles: trucks, vans, sometimes private cars . And from that moment on, we don't know anything about his whereabouts. We have no idea where it is going, where it is being used, or even whether it remains in the country,” said one Western official.

According to Bonnie Denise Jenkins, US Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security, the possibility that US weapons sent to Ukraine could fall into the wrong hands is being considered. But the US is not expressing concern.

“The US is very serious about… preventing leakage or illegal distribution. We are confident in the commitment of the Ukrainian government to properly protect and account for U.S. weapons,” Jenkins said, adding that the U.S. is in “constant contact” with Kyiv on this matter.

The problem of arms trafficking from Ukraine was discussed this week at a meeting of EU interior ministers. On Monday, the European Commission opened an “EU Support Center” in neighboring Moldova to provide expertise and cooperation on issues such as arms smuggling.

Czech Defense Minister Yana Chernochova said she believes the countries -donors are taking all necessary steps to trace weapons, but warned that it would be impossible to track every item.

“It is difficult to avoid human trafficking or smuggling – we did not achieve this in the former Yugoslavia and probably will not avoid this in Ukraine,” she said.

Europol said in April that its investigations showed that the import weapons from Ukraine to the bloc to supply organized crime groups has begun and poses a potential threat to EU security.

Yury Sak, adviser to the Minister of Defense of Ukraine, stressed that “any movement of weapons both to and from Ukraine ( when such movement is required for repairs if necessary) is very closely monitored and controlled by both Ukraine and international partners.

“The information that Ukraine is becoming a major arms smuggling center is not true,” said Sak.

He suggested that such statements “may be part of Russia's information war to discourage international partners from providing Ukraine with the weapons it needs to win.”