Cuts continue in Cuba: the regime foresees a simultaneous blackout of up to 39% of the country for this Monday

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The island has been suffering from a severe energy crisis for months, which worsened with the passage of Hurricane Ian. In some areas the lack of electricity extends for more than 12 hours a day

The cuts continue in Cuba: the regime foresees a simultaneous blackout of up to 39% of the country for this Monday< /p>In some areas of Cuba the lack of electricity extends for more than 12 hours a day (EFE)

The state Electricity Union (UNE) of Cuba foresees for this Monday cuts in the supply of electricity in up to 39% of the country during the evening, the time of greatest consumption.

For months Cuba has been suffering from a strong energy crisis, which worsened with the passage of Hurricane Ian through the west of the country at the end of September. In some areas, blackouts of more than 12 hours a day are reported.

The UNE estimates an electricity generation capacity of 2,004 megawatts (MW) for this day at peak time, when according to their calculations the maximum demand will be 3,200 MW.

The deficit -the difference between supply and demand- will be 1,196 MW and the affectation -what will really be disconnected- will be 1,266 MW, according to the UNE.

The cuts continue in Cuba: the regime foresees a simultaneous blackout of up to 39% of the country for this Monday

The Cuban people continue to suffer from the lack of electricity (AFP)

Blackouts -due to breakages and failures in the outdated thermoelectric plants, lack of fuel and scheduled maintenance- have been common for several months in the island.

At this time eight of the 20 generating units in the country are out of service due to breakdowns (distributed in 14 plants: eight land-based and six floating rented) and another three are reported for maintenance.

Seven of the eight onshore power plants are over 40 years old, when the average age of these infrastructures is 30.

The Cuban regime announced in September that it intends reduce blackouts before the end of this year with repairs and new investments.

The cuts continue in Cuba: the regime foresees a simultaneous blackout of up to 39% of the country for this Monday< /p>Cubans residing in La Palma, Arroyo Naranjo, took to the streets again last Friday to demand the restoration of water and electricity services, after a 72-hour blackout (Twitter: @diariodecuba)

Between July and September, only two days were recorded without supply cuts, according to data from the UNE collated by the EFE agency.

Supply cuts They weigh down all areas of the economy and significantly affect the daily life of Cubans, which is fueling social discontent in a country that has been going through a severe economic crisis for two years.

Since July there have been protestsacross the country for this reason, which have increased since Ian's passing. The hurricane caused a total blackout in the country on September 27 and left areas without power for days.

In Pinar del Río, the province most affected by Ian, around 10% of customers still don't have power in their homes from hurricane country, now 40 days ago.

The cuts continue in Cuba: The regime foresees a simultaneous blackout of up to 39% of the country for this Monday

A local official of the Communist Party tries to calm the protesters during a blackout in Havana (REUTERS /Alexandre Meneghini)

The blackouts were one of the main reasons behind the protests against the Miguel Díaz-Canel regime on July 11 last year, the largest in decades.

< p class="paragraph">With information from EFE