Chinese regime tightens restrictions in Beijing amid rising COVID-19 cases

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In recent months, the country has suffered waves of outbreaks attributed to the omicron variant that have caused record numbers of infections not seen since the start of the pandemic in the first half of 2020

The Chinese regime strengthens restrictions in Beijing due to the increase in cases of COVID-19

Pandemic prevention workers dressed in protective suits preparing to enter an apartment complex under lockdown for a COVID-19 outbreak in Beijing, China. November 12, 2022. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

The National Health Commission of China today reported the detection of 1,794 new positives for the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus the day before, 1,747 of them by local contagion in places like Canton (southeast, 707), Beijing (237), Henan (center, 225) or Chongqing (center, 150).

The health authorities also reported today the detection of 14,409 asymptomatic cases, 14,325 due to local contagion, although Beijing does not count them as confirmed cases unless they show symptoms.

The total of this type of infections under observation is 92,639, of which 1,036 come from other territories.

The remaining 47 symptomatic cases were found among travelers from abroad at various points of entry into the country.< /p>

China, which applies a severe “zero tolerance” policy towards the new coronavirus, has suffered waves of outbreaks in recent months attributed to the omicron variant that have caused record numbers of infections not seen since the start of the pandemic in the first half. 2020.

The National Health Commission also detailed that, until last local midnight (16:00 GMT on Sunday), 580 patients had been discharged after successfully overcoming covid.

Chinese regime tightens restrictions in Beijing amid rising COVID-19 cases

Sanitation workers in front of the fenced-in entrance of a residential complex that was put up under lockdown as outbreaks of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continue in Beijing, November 7, 2022. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

In Beijing, many schools returned to online classes, hospitals restricted their services, and some shops and restaurants closed and their staff were isolated. Videos posted on social media showed people protesting or clashing with police and health workers in some areas.

“It has become normal, like eating and sleeping,” said Yang Zheng, a 39-year-old food service worker. “I think it has more impact on children, because they have to go to school.”

The requirement to be tested every 24 to 48 hours is “annoying,” Ying Yiyang said , who works in marketing.

“My life is not comparable to what it was three years ago,” Ying added. Her visits to her family outside Beijing can be complicated if the phone app that nearly all Chinese are forced to display doesn't turn green for the return trip to the capital, she explained.

“I'm just staying in Beijing,” he said.

Numerous towns on the outskirts of Beijing, home to the workers whose work keeps the city running They were confined. Many live in community residences that taxi and carpool drivers said they were now avoiding so as not to be quarantined.

The lockdown in Guangzhou, among other places, was due to end on Sunday, but the authorities have repeatedly extended these measures without explanation.

The Chinese regime strengthens restrictions in Beijing due to the increase in cases of COVID-19

FILE PHOTO: Travelers enter the terminal of the Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing, China March 23, 2022. REUTERS/Tingshu Wang/File

The total number of active infected with symptoms in mainland China amounts to 13,389, 22 of which are serious.

According to the institution's accounts, since the start of the pandemic, 273,762 have been infected people in the country and 5,226 died, although the total number of infected excludes those who are asymptomatic.

To date, medical follow-up has been carried out on more than 9 million close contacts with infected people, of which 893,326 continue under observation.

The “zero COVID” protocol has kept China's infection rate relatively low, but has had economic repercussions and disrupted daily life with the closure of schools, factories and shops , or the isolation of neighborhoods without warning.

Given the new rise in cases, more and more areas are closing businesses and limiting movement. To enter office buildings, shopping centers or other public places, people must show a negative test result at least once a day.

As economic growth has returned to weakening after a 3.9% rebound over the previous year in the quarter that ended in September, experts had predicted bolder moves toward reopening the country, whose borders remain largely

(With information from EFE)