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Censorship increases in American libraries

Natasha Kumar By Natasha Kumar Mar14,2024

Censorship is increasing in libraries American questions

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According to the American Library Association, 4,240 school and public library works were targeted by the censorship in 2023.

Associated Press

Book bans and attempted bans increased further in the United States last year, continuing to set record levels, according to a new report from the American Library Association (ALA). ).

ALA announced Thursday that 4,240 books in school and public libraries had been targeted in 2023, a substantial increase from the record 2,571 pounds in 2022.

It's also the highest figure the library association has recorded since it began tracking the issue more than 20 years ago.

As in recent years, most challenged books (47%) have LGBTQ2+ and racial themes.

Efforts to censor dozens or even hundreds of books at a time have grown in Florida and Texas, among other states, reflecting the influence of conservative organizations such as Moms for Liberty and websites Web such as booklooks.org and ratedbooks.org.

LoadingBudget: the PLQ sounds the alarm after warnings from the Moody's and DBRS agencies

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ELSE ON INFO: Budget : the PLQ sounds the alarm after warnings from the Moody's and DBRS agencies

Each request to ban a book is a request aimed at denying the right of each person – a constitutionally protected right – to choose and read books that raise important issues and elevate the voices of people who are often silenced, said Deborah Caldwell-Stone, director of the Office for Intellectual Freedom x27;ALA.

In a statement, Ms. Caldwell-Stone said she was particularly concerned about the increase in protests in libraries public protests, which now represent around 40% of all protests, more than double the percentage in 2022.

Natasha Kumar

By Natasha Kumar

Natasha Kumar has been a reporter on the news desk since 2018. Before that she wrote about young adolescence and family dynamics for Styles and was the legal affairs correspondent for the Metro desk. Before joining The Times Hub, Natasha Kumar worked as a staff writer at the Village Voice and a freelancer for Newsday, The Wall Street Journal, GQ and Mirabella. To get in touch, contact me through my natasha@thetimeshub.in 1-800-268-7116

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