Boris Becker's new life in prison: from tennis star to philosophy professor

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The German is serving a two-and-a-half-year sentence for having concealed assets when filing for bankruptcy

Boris Becker's new life in prison: from tennis star to philosophy professor

Boris Becker spends his days in a prison in England (Reuters)

Former ATP No. 1 Boris Becker He spends his days in a jail in England after being sentenced in April this year to two and a half years for illegally transferring large sums of money and concealing assets in order to declare bankruptcy. The former tennis player must serve at least half of his sentence behind bars to then ask for parole and could even request a transfer to a prison in your country under the Government's Early Deportation Program. In the meantime, he has found a new life.

After a difficult first few months, the 54-year-old former athlete seems to have found a role in which he feels comfortable. As reported by The Sun, Becker is one of two instructors teaching ancient Greek philosophy, which encourages followers to live virtuously to help bear the misfortunes of life.”

A close source even assured the British portal that the former tennis player is comfortable with this role: “Boris has gone from mega-stardom to a bankrupt recluse in the space of a few years. He is a remarkable fall from grace and he has been forced to examine almost everything about himself. he is the perfect person to teach this course ”.

In July of this year, the winner of 49 titles on the ATP circuit: had been at the center of the conflict in Wandsworth prison, which is why he ended up being transferred from category B to category C of the prison of Huntercombe, which has “more opportunities to get out of their cells to work, educate…”, former inmate Chris Atkins told The Sun< in May. /p>

Boris Becker's new life in prison: from tennis star to philosophy professor

Boris Becker during a Wimbledon match in 1996 (Reuters)

At the time, the six-time Grand Slam winner, who was previously giving English classes to some of his With new colleagues, he had moved on to teaching sports sciences, a job considered easy and comfortable and one that he would have gotten because of who he is. But, he now he deals with ancient Greek philosophy.

Becker's first weeks in prison were very different from what he lives through today. During his first days, his main complaint was linked to the confinement and the little space he had in the cell, for which he had asked that the door be left open for him, a request that greatly annoyed the others. some guards.

The former tennis player must serve at least half of his prison sentence, then he could ask for parole. Declared bankruptcy in 2017, the former tennis player was convicted of charges including theft of assets, non-disclosure of assets and concealment of a debt. During the proceedings, the prosecution claimed that the German collected 1.13 million euros ($1.22 million) from the sale of a Mercedes car dealership he owned in Germany, which he paid into a professional bank account that he used as his personal “piggy bank” with which to pay for luxury purchases and school fees for his children.

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