Wed. Feb 28th, 2024

Boeing problems

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No Canadian airline operates the MAX 9, but some of the major carriers have partnerships with Alaska Airlines and United Airlines, both of which include the narrow-body jets in their fleets.

The Canadian Press

Canadian air travelers should be largely spared the impact of the grounding of Boeing's 737 MAX 9, but it would probably be best if they checked their itineraries more than once. /p>

Some passengers may be checked in on routes affected by the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) order , which grounded the MAX 9 after part of the fuselage tore off an Alaska Airlines plane Friday, leaving a gaping hole in the side of the cabin. /p>Open in full screen mode

Passengers on Alaska Airlines Flight 1282 had a big scare when they saw a door detach from the cabin of the plane, a Boeing 737 MAX 9, shortly after takeoff from Portland Airport, USA. Oregon.

The grounding led to cancellations for tens of thousands of passengers south of the border, with 171 planes temporarily banned from takeoff .

No Canadian airlines operate the MAX 9, but some of the major carriers have partnerships with Alaska Airlines and United Airlines, both of which include the narrow-body jets in their fleets. Alaska Airlines owns 65 MAX 9 aircraft, or 28% of its fleet, and United owns 79, or 8% of its aircraft fleet.

WestJet and Alaska have an interline agreement, allowing travel on different networks with a single reservation. Air Canada and United have entered into a codeshare agreement that allows passengers to book travel with either carrier to approximately 50 destinations in the United States and Canada, with hundreds of flights per day.

Loading in progressBoeing 737 MAX 9: torn door found, but questions remain

ELSE ON NEWS: Boeing 737 MAX 9: Torn door found, but questions remain

United said it planned to cancel 200 flights on Monday alone and hoped to reroute affected passengers to other flights.

We continue to avoid certain cancellations by using other aircraft models whenever possible.

A quote from United Airlines, via email

The extent of the ripple effect will depend on whether the problem is one-off or the product of a systemic flaw, said John Gradek, who teaches aviation management at McGill University.

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John Gradek, director of the Aviation Management Program at McGill University (Archive photo)

If it's systemic across the entire MAX 9 fleet, it could take some time and have serious implications for carriers that rely on the plane, Gradek said. p>

This aircraft is a workhorse for Alaska Airlines.

A quote from John Gradek, coordinator of the aviation management program at McGill University

Alaska canceled 21% of its flights on Sunday and United canceled some 9%, with similar proportions so far Monday, according to tracking service FlightAware. The numbers currently place airlines in the top two spots for the percentage of canceled flights in the United States and Canada.

The 171 Grounded planes will have to pass an inspection before they can resume flying, the FAA announced Saturday.

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