Barack Obama stressed that the population that voted in the elections did so for a “fairer, more egalitarian and freer” country.

Spread the love

The former president urged citizens to remain “active and participatory” in the periods between elections. The composition of the future Congress is still in suspense, with key races in both the House of Representatives and the Senate

Barack Obama stressed that the population that voted in the elections did so for a country “fairer, more ;s egalitarian and freer”

Former US President Barack Obama attends a campaign rally for Democratic US Senate candidate John Fetterman and Democratic Pennsylvania Governor candidate Josh Shapiro in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the United States, on 5 November 2022. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

The former president of the United States Barack Obama stressed that the population that has turned out to vote in the midterm elections has done so to a country “fairer, more egalitarian and freer”, before emphasizing that the results “advance” towards these objectives.

“In these elections, millions of people have cast their vote for a fairer, more equal and freer United States. We are not there yet, but this makes us move forward, “he said through his account on the social network Twitter. “Our democracy is resilient if we continue to be active and participatory in the periods between elections,” he assured.

You may be interested: < i>All the results of the elections in the United States

The composition of the future United States Congressis still up in the air two days after the polls closed, with key races in both the House of Representatives and the Senate still to be decided.< /p>

The vote count made very little progress this Wednesday, which prevented sufficient majorities from being reached to declare a winner in either of the legislative chambers. .

Barack Obama stressed that the population that voted in the elections did so for a country “fairer, more ;s egalitarian and freer”

Ballots are counted in the United States mid-term elections, at the Maricopa County Election Center in Phoenix, Arizona, United States, on November 9, 2022. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart

In the case of the Lower House, according to the projections of the main US media, the Republicans are ahead at dawn this Thursday, having secured at least < b>207 of the 218 seats they need to control it.

The Democrats, meanwhile, have 184 seats< /b>, and more than a quarantine are yet to be decided.

This advantage, in addition to the fact that the conservatives are ahead in the scrutiny in several of the races yet to be decided, makes many media anticipate a Republican victory as likely. in the House.

In the case of the Senate, the situation is much less clear: of the 100 seats, the Democrats have secured 48 and the Republicans, 49. Two of the states that have yet to finish counting –Arizona and Nevada– lean towards the progressive and conservative sides respectively, although it is still too early to declare a winner on either side.

Barack Obama stressed that the population that voted in the elections did so for a country “fairer, more ;s egalitarian and freer”

United States President Joe Biden responds to a question during a press conference held after the 2022 midterm elections in the United States, in the State Dining Room of the White House, in Washington, United States , on November 9, 2022. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

The third state in dispute, Georgia, will hold a runoff between the Republican candidate and the democrat next December 6, as none of the candidates passed the threshold of 50% of the votes in the first round.

To maintain control of the Senate, Democrats need to win 50 seats – the casting vote of Vice President Kamala Harris thus guarantees them victory in the voting when there is a tie-, while the Republicans, not having that quality vote, need to obtain 51 seats.

Aside from the legislative chamber, there are also pending races in the governorships -that is, the state executives- of Nevada, Arizona, Oregon and Alaska.< /p>

The local electoral authorities have already warned that the count could take several more days, especially in the case of the Senate.

(With information from Europa Press and EFE)

Keep reading: